ADOPTION OF PRECISION AGRICULTURE TECHNOLOGY

Gregg Ibendahl 1, Elizabeth A. Yeager 1, and Terry W Griffin1

1Department of Agricultural Economics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, USA

twgriffin@ksu.edu

 

ABSTRACT

Precision agriculture technologies have been available for adoption and utilization at the farm level for several decades. Some technologies have been readily adopted while others were adopted more slowly. An analysis of 621 Kansas Farm Management Association (KFMA) farmer members provided insights regarding adoption of technology. The likelihood that farms adopt specific technology given that other technology had been adopted are reported. Results indicate some technologies were more readily adopted than others. These results are useful to farmers considering investment in technology, retailers targeting potential technology adopters, and manufacturers in supply chain management.


BIOGRAPHY

Dr Ibendahl is an Associate Professor in Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University. Dr. Ibendahl grew up on a grain and beef farm in Illinois and worked for a major agricultural seed company before returning to school to earn his PhD. Dr. Ibendahl holds an Extension position at K-State and works in the areas of farm management and agricultural finance

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IFMA

The objective of the International Farm Management Association is to further the knowledge and understanding of farm business management and to exchange ideas and information about farm management theory and practice throughout the world. The IFMA is a non profit-making organisation and currently the Association has members in over 50 countries.

Congress Managers

Please contact the team at Conference Design with any questions regarding the Congress.

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